Transcript

Dr. Nina:
Hey there. Welcome to the Dr. Nina Show here on LA Talk Radio. I’m your host, Dr. Nina Savelle-Rocklin, and I am here to help you stop counting calories, carbs and grams so you can easily get to a happy weight and get on with your life. I just want to know, Instagram people, can you hear me? We’re having a little bit of problems. Ronin, I can hear everything that I’m saying. Oh no, it stopped. Okay. I was getting an echo. I could hear everything that I was saying. And you guys can hear me too? Amazing. Okay, I’m so happy. We have finally, finally, finally worked out our technological issues. After five months of being away from the studio, we did it. You can hear me, hopefully I can hear my callers, and we’re in business.

Dr. Nina:
So, I want to tell you that, first of all, we are at a new time, 11:00 Pacific, and a new number. If you want to call and join. The new number is 323-203-0815. 323-203-0815. New number, new time. Change is good. Okay, so give me a call because I would love to hear what is on your mind, what is weighing on you. Because the real problem with binge eating, stress eating, any kind of emotional eating, the real problem is not food. The problem is not food. The problem is what is eating at you. And that’s what we want to get to the bottom of, that’s what we want to resolve.

Okay. I have one question from Carly, and she says, “Simple concept, but it’s hard. Do you have advice for how to know when one is full? Maybe this could be a show topic.” Absolutely. Carly, I’m going to answer your question after my caller. Caller, hello?

Karlygash:
Good morning, Dr. Nina.

Dr. Nina:
Hey. Karlygash, give me a second. Instagram, can you hear Karlygash? Hopefully you can hear Karlygash.

Karlygash:
Good morning. I’ll say something.

Dr. Nina:
Instagram people, can you hear Karlygash? Can you hear her? “No. No, we cannot hear her.” Ronin, they cannot hear her. All right. I’m unplugging her. So, I’m just doing this the old fashioned way, and we’re just going to go through the computer speakers. Hey Karlygash, what’s going on?

Karlygash:
Good morning, Dr. Nina. So, yesterday was a very hard day for me. I read that sugar so bad for our health, so I decided to quit sugar yesterday. And like you say, depravation leads to overeating. Guess what I was doing? I was binging on sugar the whole day on sweetened chocolate, typically what I don’t eat like Kit Kat bars and stuff. And I had remorse and I was beating myself up that I cannot make it. In the evening, closer to midnight, I had emotional breakdown, because I was buying stuff at a grocery store. I missed the time for my evening walk for my exercise, and I normally need like a couple of hours for my daily steps. And I noticed that I don’t have time, I have only 45 minutes left, and I started running. I ran, though. I did the steps. And then I started crying. I was crying so much in my car, and it was not pretty crying at all. Like you know how women cry in movies. I was like growling like a bear, like literally, like roar sounds were not pretty.

Dr. Nina:
You were sobbing. You were actually expressing feelings. Pretty crying only happens in movies, and nobody’s really truly sad. Right? What you were experiencing was some kind of guttural, soul wrenching pain, that kind of guttural, groaning, moaning feeling that you can’t stop, and heaving horrible sobs. And sometimes it’s not quite that intense, but that’s how you process feelings, that’s how you get rid of them.

Karlygash:
Well, I never seen anyone crying like that. And I was wondering, “Oh my God, even the way I cry, not so pretty like those women.” It’s more like an animal, a best.

Dr. Nina:
But Karlygash, who are these women you’re comparing yourself to? Are they people that you see on TV? That’s not real crying. I hear a lot of people cry, and it’s healthy. It’s a healthy way to express yourself.

Karlygash:
Well, maybe. I guess it’s because I feel comfortable because whenever I try to cry, my emotions are … I don’t know if there is a comparison to emotions of different people. But I live full emotional life. And when I was a kid, if I cry I cry. And I give myself to this like 100%. And I was always stopped. Whenever I cried or threw tantrums, whatever, I always stopped. Any emotion from me, which was a little bit higher than, I don’t know, than weird standards of my family. It was tough. It was like judged. And I noticed that I am second guessing myself, double checking if the emotion I’m experiencing now is proper, is it allowed, instead of just this is what I have.

Dr. Nina:
Okay, so a couple of thoughts on that is, Karlygash, you don’t have to earn the right to express yourself or to feel your feeling. It’s not allowable or not allowable. What happens is our culture makes it into a bad thing. Our culture says, “Oh, if you’re sad, you’re depressed, you’re too sad. You need to go on antidepressants.” Now, obviously some people certainly benefit from antidepressants. In no way am I suggesting that all people should forgo antidepressants. But when we have natural human emotions in response to a situation, in response to something that’s going on in your life, natural human grief or pain or whatever it is, that is a sign that you are human.

You don’t earn the right to feel it. Our society just says, “Hey, don’t feel these feelings.” That’s our society because people just can’t deal with it. They’re just so uncomfortable. And this is a problem because then what do we do with our feelings? Well, sometimes we eat them. And other people do other things to deal with the fact that we live in a culture that doesn’t allow for the normal, healthy expression of emotion.

Karlygash:
Thank you. It makes so much sense. Well, I guess I will now just look at what I have rather than trying to mold myself into some sort of standard which doesn’t exist in the first place. And I was crying and I was like, “I am hurt. It’s painful.” I was saying all those things to the people who hurt me. And it sucks to be hurt like that. And after that, I felt better. I became so quiet, even in my head. I noticed that because I never had privacy as a kid and everyone was trying to change me, saying that I’m this and that, everywhere, at home, at school, at musical school, the yard. Everywhere. That I notice that I do this to myself in my own head. So, I cannot just lay down in my bed or do something and be quiet. When I’m quiet, I’m like I try to find anything in me, criticize it, and like find a flaw or find something where I’m not normal, and always point on it. Point how I’m not matching the norms or how I’m achieving here. I cannot just be satisfied with what I have, and that leads to a very bad thing.

Dr. Nina:
Yes. So, I would say that it’s important to look at if you can’t be with yourself without pointing out perceived defects or deficits or flaws or whatever, think about a time in your life when people were judgmental or critical of you. And what happens is that what starts out as relational, someone else is saying something to you, someone else is being critical and judgmental to you, becomes internal. You are now saying it to yourself. You’ve identified with their judgment and their criticism, and now you are being as judgmental and critical and tearing yourself apart as you once experienced from someone else. So, therefore, it’s important to recognize who’s voice is that.

And there are two reasons. By the way, there are two reasons people develop critical voices. One is people are critical to them, and they start being critical to themselves. The other is, people leave them alone too much. They’re too much left to raise themselves. And kids who don’t have enough boundaries or containment create these rigid, horrible rules for themselves and they create this mean, judgmental internal critical.

Karlygash:
It’s like as a survival safety measure, right, when it doesn’t come from a healthy adult?

Dr. Nina:
Yes.

Karlygash:
And when they don’t model the house boundaries and show how navigating the world in a healthy, effective way. Because kids need some boundaries, they create it themselves, but not because they cannot do it right sometimes.

Dr. Nina:
Exactly.

Karlygash:
That’s why the criticism serves as a parent who was absent, who was absent there to show how to live life properly.

Dr. Nina:
Beautifully said and exactly right. Yes.

Karlygash:
But this is so sad, Dr. Nina. This is so sad.

Dr. Nina:
It is. It is. And it has to be mourned. And you realize that we can change, we can change the way we relate to ourselves. That’s the good news. We can change the way we relate to ourselves by first recognizing where it comes from, grieving what happened and what didn’t happen, as we cultivate a kinder, more compassionate way of being with ourselves. You can’t just say, “I’m going to be nice to myself,” without realizing why you’re not nice to yourself.

Karlygash:
Well, I’m very grateful to you, Dr. Nina. I was all sad yesterday. I was actually, thanks to the work I’m doing with you and your books and your shows and your Facebook group and Facebook page, all this amazing work, it’s a really vital support system for me. With all this yesterday, with all this critical voices and this crying and pain, I was actually much kinder to myself yesterday than I was before in my life. I was kinder and I could take care of myself a little bit.

And back to what you said about parents and when kids try to establish boundaries. I don’t understand why some parents give birth to kids when they cannot raise them. I don’t understand it. I personally think that we should licenses to people for being parents and check their sanity and their ability to raise a kid and be good parents.

Dr. Nina:
Many of us would not be here.

Karlygash:
What?

Dr. Nina:
Many of us would not be here if that were the case. I think my parent would’ve failed that test. A lot of parents would fail. The population of the United States and the world would plummet. But all we can do is, once we’re here, to be able to find a new way to be with ourselves and with each other.

Karlygash:
So, I will re-parent myself, right?

Dr. Nina:
Re-parenting yourself and allowing other people’s kindness and compassion in as well. Because when we’re mean to ourselves, it’s very hard sometimes to let in the good. When we’re mean to ourselves, people who are mean to us seem like people who really know us well. If you’re meant to me, that sounds familiar. I think I’ll have you in my life. Whereas, when we’re kind to ourselves and loving and supportive [crosstalk 00:15:27].

Karlygash:
That’s for me job. That’s for me job to be kind. But Dr. Nina, I have a tricky question. So, if I’m supposed to re-parent myself, but I never had healthy whatever parents so I don’t know it, how am I supposed to re-parent myself in a healthy way? Well, I found the way I’m doing your work. First of all, I’m finding the norm, the standard of what is healthy. I went this way. So, first I find the definition of what is healthy, what is kind. And then I am doing this. I’m learning this concept again, like a new concept for me, and planting it into my brain consciousness and everything. And then I re-parent myself from there. But this is so laborious, I want to tell you. And this is the way I found, and we do what’s right.

Dr. Nina:
Well, you re-parent yourself by replacing the original either lack of parenting or the original cruel parents with someone else’s voice. So, you internalize someone else’s voice, someone who is kind to you and understanding and who maybe guides you, like maybe my voice. We all need a way to be kind to ourselves. And if parenting is the word that we’re using for being loving and kind and supportive, an ideal parent kind of thing, it doesn’t matter where that voice comes from. It matters that you take it in and start to make it your own. Because that’s what we do with our parents, right, or whoever it is who causes us pain, and then that creates a toxic relationship with ourselves. We take their voices in. Just as you used to call in and you’d say, “You, well, so.” Right? And the tone of your voice would even change and you’d talk to yourself in this mean way, which you’re not doing. I haven’t heard that for a while.

Karlygash:
Thank you.

Dr. Nina:
You took that in, and now you’ve expelled it. That’s why I call the work I do, I call it a psychological exorcism. Not bad for a nice Jewish girl. I’m giving exorcisms all over the place. So, the idea is then to take in someone else’s kind voice, loving voice, supportive voice, voice that is there for you, and then internalize that.

Karlygash:
Thank you so much. It’s very helpful. So, this week, I’ll just focus on being aware about any voices coming into me like a stimulus that made it from outside, like some people who are around me or exchanges on the street. Because not all of them are kind. But because I take in all people as kind, doesn’t work. So, I’ll just check on every incoming voice, stimulus, whatever touches my life, I will just check if the voice is kind or not. If it’s kind, I will leave it for myself and internalize it. If not, I will just remove it from and say whatever that [crosstalk 00:18:48].

Dr. Nina:
Challenge it. Say, “I do not accept what you have to say, and you are not right.” And when you start finding fault about yourself, I want you to say, “I am doing to myself what was done to me, and I reject that. I didn’t like it at the time, and I’m not going to do it to myself, and they were wrong. They were wrong about me.”

Karlygash:
Thank you.

Dr. Nina:
I think that’s a wonderful challenge that you’ve set for yourself, and I know that you can meet it, and I look forward to hearing how you do.

Karlygash:
Thank you so much. I will. Thank you so, so much. Have a wonderful day, Dr. Nina.

Dr. Nina:
You too, Karlygash. Thanks for calling.

Karlygash:
I love you. Bye-bye.

Dr. Nina:
Bye. Okay, so we have Karlygash, and we have a question from Carly who asked how to know how to stop eating when she’s full. Well, obviously, Carly, you also want to figure out are you emotionally eating or are you emotionally hungry or are you physically hungry. So, let’s just assume that you’ve been physically hungry and you just don’t know when to stop because you’ve lost touch with your hunger cues and your satiation satiety cues and all of that.

So, one thing to do is to think of it as a scale. Try to gauge it. So, 1 is absolutely ravenous and starving and just that starving, ravenous feeling. And 10 is the most stuffed, awful, horrible feeling when you just had way, way too much and you could just sit there going, “Why did I eat that?” Right? In between is a range. So, you want to look at five or six as the idea. Five or six is when you are not hungry, but not full. And you want to say, “Okay, how hungry am I? Am I ravenous, a one? Am I pretty starving, a two? Am I pretty hungry, a three? Am I now getting a little bit more … Now that I’m eating, how full am I? Am I still hungry? Am I a four? Okay.” And when you start to recognize the feeling of, well, what’s a five or a six.

And it takes practice. If you are completely separated from your hunger and you can’t find full, first, just practice gauging it from a physiological place. And then if you keep eating, okay, how full am I? Am I getting a little uncomfortable, maybe a seven? Am I really uncomfortably full, eight, nine? Am I just horribly and awfully full, 10? And the more that you have those in your mind, you just try to gauge it, the more you’ll get tuned in to your body and to what feels like too much and what is not enough.

And by the way, I will say something that one of the reasons that people binge has nothing to do with emotions or conflicts or anything psychological. One of the reasons people end up binging is because they don’t eat enough and they get so hungry, so, so, so starving, that they can’t stop eating. It takes a while for your stomach to realize that you finally have food in it. And so, that is one reason why you might have a hard time knowing when you’re full. And then it goes from, “Oh my God, now I’m way too full.” From, “I’m starving, I’m starving, I’m starving.” “Oh my God, I’m way too full.”

And so, be careful, Carly, not to be too hungry, not to let too much time go between meals, and to just eat enough that is good for your metabolism and for your level of hunger. So, I hope that answers your question. If you have any further questions, please feel free to ask.

Josh is saying our first food source is our mother’s breast. Hopefully, because some people don’t believe in breastfeeding. But yes, our first food source is our mother’s breast. And it is tied to a sense of being held and comforted and you’re safe and you’re in this blissful relationship with another person, your mother. And that is why food in our psyches registers as mothering, as nurturing, as relationship. So, that is something also to keep in mind.

Carly, let me go back a little bit. Let me go back a little bit and say that it’s also important to distinguish between physical hunger and emotional hunger. So, physical hunger is physical. You feel it in your body. Your stomach is growing. You feel lightheaded. You feel that sort of spacey feeling. That’s what happens to me. I lose my words, I can’t speak, I have no recall, and it sounds like an alien has come out of my stomach. I really try not to get that hungry. It’s not good. And when you’re physically hungry, pretty much anything sounds good because you’re hungry. So, you may not be a fan of oranges, but you’re really hungry, you’re going to eat an orange if that’s all that’s there.

Emotional hunger is located more in your mind. Something sounds good, something looks good. “If I eat that, I’ll feel better.” So, emotional hunger is when you think that what you are going to eat will change the way you feel emotionally. YOu’ll be less stressed, you’ll be happier, you’re going to just feel comforted, something like that.

And when you have emotional hunger, you’re more picky. “What really sounds good is ice cream,” or “Pizza sounds good,” or something like that. Some kind of food that’s going to make you feel better emotionally. That’s emotional hunger. In contrast to, “Hey, it’s lunchtime. I’m looking at the menu. Pizza sounds good, I’m going to have that for lunch.” So, very important. Figure out are you emotionally hungry or are you physically hungry, and then use the gauge, the hunger gauge, hunger and fullness scale, to figure out are you full, have you reached satiety or not.

Josh, it’s saying we can express love by giving food to people. Yes, and therein lies the problem. Because if food is love, and if some people have experience that the only way that they feel loved is when someone makes them food, then food equals love and they’re more likely to eat more food to symbolically take in more love. We need to find ways to express love and receive love that have nothing to do with food.

Okay. So, if you would like to join me, if you have any other questions, the number in the studio, new number, new number, is 323-203-0815. 323-203-0815. Give me a call. And let’s talk about what is on your mind, what is eating at you, what is weighing on you because it’s important.

Let’s see. Okay. Let’s see if we have any callers. No callers. All right. I am going to randomly, unless there are any questions from you on Instagram, I’m going to randomly open my book and read something from it. Let’s see. Blindly opening it. Okay. All right. So, I turned to it could be worse, which is minimizing. Minimizing is one of the defense mechanisms we use to tell ourselves that are things are okay when they’re not.

Talia, who just had a really difficult conversation with her father the previous night. She had just been accepted to med school at a very prestigious university. And she rushed home to tell her parents. And she was so excited. She was going to go to this med school that was a very decent med school. And what does her father say? “Too bad you didn’t get into Yale.” Jenny’s on. Okay. To be continued. Taliya’s story will be continued. Hi, Jenny.

Jenny:
Hi, how are you, Dr. Nina?

Dr. Nina:
I am fine, Jenny. What’s going on?

Jenny:
Well. I’m hearing myself in an echo. Are you hearing me an echo?

Dr. Nina:
I’m not hearing you in an echo. You’re hearing yourself on an echo?

Jenny:
I’m hearing myself in an echo. Can you hear me? Hello?

Dr. Nina:
Yeah, I hear you.

Jenny:
Yeah. Okay. I’m just hearing myself on an echo, so I’m sorry if I …

Dr. Nina:
Ronin. That happens to me a lot when I start the show. Ronin, is there anything we can do about Jenny’s echo, or should she just keep talking and it will get better?

Jenny:
Maybe it will go away. I think I don’t hear my echo anymore.

Dr. Nina:
Okay, wonderful.

Jenny:
Good, okay, so that’s the trick, just keek talking.

Dr. Nina:
Just keep talking. Just keep talking.

Jenny:
Just keep talking. Okay. How are you today, by the way, Dr. Nina?

Dr. Nina:
I am fine. It was a lovely foggy morning here in LA as you know because you’re also in LA. I had eight vials of blood drawn at the doctor this morning. Oh yeah. Eight vials. It’s a miracle I’m even talking. Eight vials of blood.

Jenny:
Do they still give you a cookie to bring up your blood sugar?

Dr. Nina:
They do not give you a cookie. It was a fasting blood draw, and I’ve never had so many vials of blood taken from me at one time. It was crazy. But aside from that, I’m just very …

Jenny:
I’m glad you’re alive, Dr. Nina.

Dr. Nina:
Yes, yes.

Jenny:
I did not have a productive morning as you did, unfortunately.

Dr. Nina:
Well, I just produced a lot of blood.

Jenny:
Yes. But I don’t know. I’m having a very frustrating week, which I really think that a lot of us who are unemployed right now and living on the unemployment insurance here in America in general are probably really frustrated. And I’ve been having little Zoom calls with my neighbors who are in the same boat as me, and really getting enlightened about what’s going on. And the pandemic unemployment ended and it’s less now because the federal government can’t make a decision. The Republicans, I’m sorry for anyone Republican out there, but I’m just done, done, and I’m just so frustrated because some of us are only going to get $5 paychecks this week.

So, I went to the store yesterday, I went to Target, because I’m like, “Okay, Target’s cheap. I’m going to go to Target and I’m going to go grocery shopping at Target.” It was the worst decision I could’ve made, because Target is not like a real grocery store. It’s a limited selection. Not everything’s organic. And I wound up feeling like a college kid, buying cheap rosé. And you know I love my rosé. I bought cheap rosé and all these cheap snacks. And I’m just so frustrated because living on a budget of $49, which is what my check’s going to be this week because the pandemic insurance lapsed. And our government doesn’t give a shit about us. Excuse my language if I can’t say the S-H-I-T word.

Dr. Nina:
Any language is okay here because we’re on global internet radio.

Jenny:
And I’m just really, really I have this feeling of rage inside of me for the senate, for our government, for our city, for our state. I just feel like they just could give a crap less about us. And I already am like alone, which a lot of people are because we’re all still kind of socially distancing and far from our families and not working. And it just feels like a real slam when the only thing keeping us afloat was that $600 which still isn’t for LA livable, really, as a single person. And now that’s taken away. And what am I supposed to eat, ramen noodles like college? Is that where it’s going to go.

Dr. Nina:
It is very upsetting, and it feels very unfair, and I hear you. It is a terrible situation. It is a frustrating situation. You’ve mentioned that you work on TV and movie sets, and nobody’s making TV shows or movies. And it’s just so awful to feel powerless and treated unfairly as if there’s nothing you can do about it. I absolutely hear you. It’s so upsetting.

Jenny:
And like my neighbor, she’s unemployed as well and she’s looking for a job. You hear on television and from right out of Trump’s mouth that there was all these jobs, like Amazon’s hiring 30,000 employees and Costco’s hiring and all these places. And she’s applied for like 50 jobs in the past week and hasn’t gotten one phone call. And I feel like it’s a bullshit lie from the government. Now I’m starting to be a conspiracy theorist. Because she is a person who is well, who is able to work, and she hasn’t gotten one phone call. So, what does that mean? Do these jobs really exist, or are they just saying that to seem like our economy is getting better so they can cut our unemployment? And I know that I’m in a better position than a lot of other people, but thinking about what’s going to happen to people who are really struggling with children and families that rely on that money, it just sends me into a tizzy. More so than even the masks did last week. I was in a tizzy over the mask issue last week. Because money is something you need to survive. We need that to provide, literally.

Dr. Nina:
Tizzy is such a nice word to describe anger. What if you used a different word other than you’re in a tizzy?

Jenny:
Let’s see. What’s a synonym for tizzy? I feel like my mom says that word, like I’ve become like my 70-year-old mother. I’m using like tizzy. But I don’t know. I feel rage.

Dr. Nina:
Rage. Exactly. See, the difference between tizzy, “I’m in a tizzy over this,” and “I am enraged.” Which one do you actually feel when you say I’m enraged versus I’m in a tizzy? Tizzy is like a nice Jane Austin novel of, “Oh, I’m in a tizzy.” And rage is really that’s what I’m hearing, and that’s where it’s coming from. Waleed on Instagram is saying, “The pandemic is f-ing all of us, Doc.” Indeed. Indeed.

Jenny:
Yeah.

Dr. Nina:
Josh is saying anger can hide our genuine emotions from us. No. Josh, anger is a genuine emotion. It can sometimes disguise pain. Sometimes people find it easier to feel rage than they do to feel sadness. But rage is one of the emotions, the main emotions that we feel. Mad, sad, glad, and afraid. And so, Jenny, expressing how mad you are, how enraged you are, I can feel it as you’re saying it. How are you feeling about saying how you feel? Because we can’t change the situation, but we can change how we feel about the situation, even for a little bit, when we express it. So, how do you feel expressing it?

Jenny:
I feel better. And if you could see me, I’m using my Jersey girl hand motions at the same time, like throwing my fist up in the air. And now that you say the emotion, I think that a lot of my anger and rage does come from fear. Because when I was a child, I was afraid all the time because my father was an alcoholic. And there was a lot of fear, which I think then the fear became anger. And my mom used to say, “I think I need to take you to anger management” when I was a kid. She used to say that to me because I didn’t know how to express fear other than get upset and angry.

Dr. Nina:
Well, fear and sadness are passive emotions. Anger is an active emotion. It feels alive. It feels like you’re doing something. Whereas fear and sadness, they just make us feel even more helpless. But I would say that perhaps you felt both. Perhaps you felt afraid and angry at your circumstances. It doesn’t have to be one or the another. But sometimes there’s just a primary emotion.

Jenny:
Yeah.

Dr. Nina:
And you can feel both fear and anger in saying some of us with the pandemic, although the woman who drew my blood this morning told me that she thinks that the hospitals are putting something into people to give them COVID. So, that was one conspiracy theory I hadn’t heard before. I just said nothing.

Jenny:
Oh my God.

Dr. Nina:
So, I digress. I know, I know. And again, people create all kinds of ideas to make themselves feel like they have a knowledge of what’s going on when we have almost no knowledge of what’s going on other than what science is telling us. So, I would say good for you. You’re expressing your anger, you’re expressing your rage, and maybe you can get in touch with some of that fear, some of that anxiety. And it is scary to be out of work for months. It is scary to have that economic safety net taken away. That is scary. Both your fear and your anger need your attention.

Jenny:
Okay. Well, I will try to give it my attention and not let it overwhelm me, but it’s really hard.

Dr. Nina:
Try there is not. Try there is not. I love my Star Wars. There is no try.

Jenny:
I know.

Dr. Nina:
You’re going to do it. You’re going to give it a [crosstalk 00:40:18]. Yeah.

Jenny:
You’re right, I’m going to do it.

Dr. Nina:
You just did it.

Jenny:
Thank you.

Dr. Nina:
You’ve already done it.

Jenny:
It always makes me actually feel better to just let it out, so that’s why I like to call every week, and hopefully people can relate. I don’t think I’m the only person in the world who feels this way.

Dr. Nina:
People can relate. And I get messages all the time about all my callers saying, “Oh my gosh, I so relate to Jenny,” or “Oh my gosh, what Karlygash as been through,” and the different callers who call regularly. Yes, when you’re speaking, you’re speaking the truth of many, many people. And you’re giving voice to many people who feel exactly the way that you do. And that empowers them to feel not alone and to maybe give it a voice as well. So, I thank you for calling in and sharing your truth.

Jenny:
Well, thank you. And I will talk to you hopefully next week.

Dr. Nina:
I look forward to it, Jenny. Take good care.

Jenny:
Thanks, Dr. Nina.

Dr. Nina:
Bye. So, I’m going to leave the story of [inaudible 00:41:34] the book. It’s on page 113. It could be worse, minimizing. And by the way, if you are interested in my book, I am currently giving away two free chapters of my book, The Binge Cure, Seven Steps to Outsmart Emotional Eating. Just go to my website, drninainc.com, and sign up and get your two free chapters today.

I want to actually end on a heartwarming note. So, you guys know that I have this enormous great dane, ginormous great dane Zane, Zane the Dane. 165 pounds of pure puppy love, and he’s deaf, and he’s partially sighted, and he’s just like the sweetest thing in the world. Well, Zane has some problems, so he had to eat a healthier dog food. So, the vet recommended The Farmer’s Dog, which makes human grade dog food. It’s shipped to your house. It’s amazing. It’s human grade. It’s very healthy. It’s a lot better than just giving pellets.

And so, at first Zane loved it, until he didn’t. He loved it, he loved it, he loved it, and then he didn’t love it anymore. And I wrote to The Farmer’s Dog and I said, “I have to cancel my subscription. We’ve tried everything to get him to eat it. He’s eating another brand of human grade dog food, but he won’t eat yours.” And I thought they’d say, “Okay, subscription canceled.” That’s it.

Do you know what they said? They said, “We are so sorry. And if you give the dog food that you currently have to a shelter, we will reimburse you for it.” Amazing, right? But wait, it gets better. I wrote them and I said I have an autoimmune disease. I am not going to any dog shelter to give away any food, but thank you anyway. I think it’s really great that you do that for people.” And they said, “We are going to reimburse you right now for all of the dog food that Zane has not had.” And I’m talking about over $200, people. Over $200 of human grade dog food in our freezer that they reimbursed to me and just said, “Get it to the shelter when you can.” How amazing is that?

I don’t know why he stopped liking it, Josh. He’s finicky. He’s Zane. I don’t know. I wish he could talk. I wish he could say, “Well, this is why.” Maybe he didn’t like the texture, I don’t know. But for whatever reason he stopped liking it. This company, The Farmer’s Dog, they reimbursed all of that dog food, even when I have not yet, and of course I will, give it to a shelter. Nice things that people do in the world that I just thought I want to, maybe every week, talk about something good that’s happening. We hear so much bad.

So, if you hear or know of anything good going on, if you’ve done something good for another person, if someone else has done a random act of kindness for you, let me know. I’m going to share it, I’m going to share it on the show, because those types of things need to be known. We are living in a scary, scary world for so many reasons. But we’re also living in a world where people show up, risk their lives, do the right thing, and then just do a kind thing, do a nice thing, do a generous thing. The Farmer’s Dog, you as a company, you totally rock and I appreciate you. I appreciate you, Farmer’s Dog.

So, if anyone out there has a dog who needs human grade dog food, I highly recommend The Farmers Dog. I think it is an anomaly that my super picky dog who does this every once in a while. He’ll just go off his food. Very ironic that he has an eating disorder specialist for a mommy, he develops an eating disorder. But I just want to give a shout out to The Farmer’s Dog. Thank you.

And thank you everyone who called in and everyone who is listening and tuning in also on Instagram. Take good came of yourself this week. Stay healthy, stay safe. And I will see you back here next week at the new time of 11am Pacific. And if you missed a show, you can always find it on Apple podcasts. And again, get your two free chapters of my book, The Binge Cure, at drninainc.com. Have a great week. See you next week. Bye-bye.

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